7,500 boots are on display at Fort Bragg to honor US service members killed since 9/11

More than 7,500 boots on display at Fort Bragg this month served as a temporary memorial to service members from all branches who have died since 9/11.

The boots — which had the service members’ photos and dates of death — were on display for Fort Bragg’s Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation’s annual Run, Honor and Remember 5k on May 18 and for the 82nd Airborne Division’s run that kicked off All American Week.

“It shows the families the service members are still remembered, honored and not forgotten,” said Charlotte Watson, program manager of Fort Bragg’s Survivor Outreach Services.


The idea for the display came from similar ones at Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The first display at Fort Bragg was in Hedrick Stadium in 2014. It was organized by Fort Bragg’s Survivor Outreach Services and Fisher House.

Jonathan Lomax, who was in the Marines for 21 years, was among those who stopped to see the boots and pay his respects on May 17.

Though Lomax knows of Marines who died in combat, he said he hoped he didn’t recognize names on the boots as he strolled among the multiple rows on the field at Hedrick Stadium.

“Any loss of life is severe, so all of these are my brothers and sisters,” Lomax said. “That’s the way I look at it.”

Memorial at Fort Bragg: 7500 boots to honor the fallen

Memorial at Fort Bragg: 7500 boots to honor the fallen

Memorial at Fort Bragg: 7500 boots to honor the fallen

Memorial at Fort Bragg: 7500 boots to honor the fallen

He paused to reflect on what the boots symbolized.

“It means we’ve lost good soldiers, a lot of good service members fighting for this country,” he said. “And this is just recent. It’s not even the ones we’ve lost before (9/11) — a lot of young people.”

This was the fourth year that Beth Grimshaw volunteered to help set up the display.

One of the boots represented Dr. Mark Taylor, a lieutenant colonel who Grimshaw worked with at Womack Army Medical Center. He was a surgeon assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division Forward Surgical Team.

Taylor was killed during a rocket attack on March 20, 2004, in Fallujah, Iraq.

“I’ve got some friends’ husbands who are out here,” said Grimshaw, who paused to reflect on May 17. “I’d like to see this out so they’re not forgotten.”

Heading into Memorial Day, Watson said the boots were on display to serve as a reflection of the sacrifices that all military branches have made.

“The true meaning of Memorial Day is not picnics and barbecues, though those are great things, the meaning is paying tribute,” she said.

———

©2019 The Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, N.C.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SEE ALSO: A Fort Bragg Drop Zone Has Become Hallowed Ground For Some Paratroopers

WATCH NEXT: That Time The Air Force Dropped A Humvee On Fort Bragg

Opinion | The Business of Health Care Depends on Exploiting Doctors and Nurses – The New York Times

The E.M.R. is now “conveniently available” to log into from home. Many of my colleagues devote their weekends and evenings to the spillover work. They feel they can’t sign off until they’ve documented all the critical details of their patients’ complex medical histories, followed up on all the test results, sorted out all the medication inconsistencies, and responded to all the calls and messages from patients. This does not even include the hours of compliance modules, annual mandates and administrative requirements that they are expected to complete “between patients.”

For most doctors and nurses, it is unthinkable to walk away without completing your work because dropping the ball could endanger your patients. I stop short of accusing the system of drawing up a premeditated business plan to manipulate medical professionalism into free labor. Rather, I see it as a result of administrative creep. One additional task after another is piled onto the clinical staff members, who can’t — and won’t — say no. Patients keep getting their medications and their surgeries and their office visits. From an administrative perspective, all seems to be purring along just fine.

But it’s not fine. This month the World Health Organization recognized the serious effects of burnout from chronic workplace stress. Burnout levels among doctors are at new highs, far worse than among the general population, and increasing relentlessly. Burnout among nurses is similarly rising and is highest among those on the front line of patient care. Doctors and nurses commit suicide at higher rates than in almost any other profession. Higher levels of burnout are also associated with more medical errors and compromised patient safety.

This status quo is not sustainable — not for medical professionals and not for our patients.

Mission statements for health care systems and hospitals are replete with terms like “excellence,” “high-quality” and “commitment.” While these may sound like Madison Avenue buzzwords on a slick brochure, they represent the core values of the people who labor in these institutions. Health care is by no means perfect, but what good exists is because of individuals who strive to do the right thing.

It is this very ethic that is being exploited every day to keep the enterprise afloat.

The health care system needs to be restructured to reflect the realities of patient care. From 1975 to 2010, the number of health care administrators increased 3,200 percent. There are now roughly 10 administrators for every doctor. If we converted even half of those salary lines to additional nurses and doctors, we might have enough clinical staff members to handle the work. Health care is about taking care of patients, not paperwork.

Those at the top need to think about the ramifications of their decisions. Counting on nurses and doctors to suck it up because you know they won’t walk away from their patients is not just bad strategy. It’s bad medicine.

T.I.’s Sister Died from Cocaine and High Blood Pressure Says Medical Examiner | TMZ.com

T.I.‘s sister, Precious Harris, had enough cocaine in her system to trigger heart arrhythmia when she crashed her car and later died … according to the Medical Examiner’s report.

The Fulton County M.E.’s report says Precious died from “cocaine toxicity which aggravated hypertensive cardiovascular disease (high blood pressure).” The report goes on to say the high blood pressure caused an abnormal heart rhythm … which went on long enough that disrupted the blood flow to her organs, including, most importantly, her brain. 

The report points out Precious was suffering from several other ailments … including chronic lung disease, kidney disease and diabetes.

As we first reported, Precious was driving T.I.’s Dodge Avenger with his grandniece, Kairi Chapman, in the passenger seat when she fell unconscious and veered off the road, crashing into a telephone pole. Paramedics took to the hospital and she had to be placed on life support.

She was never responsive after the accident, and died about a week later when the family decided to remove support.

As we told you … Tip and Tiny halted production of their reality show ‘Friends & Family Hustle’ after learning about what happened. Precious was a frequent guest on the series.

T.I. — who was incredibly close to his sister — shared a message after her death saying, “We Love You Dearly Baby Girl….”

Precious was 66.